Teaching

Philosophy

Teaching History

As a student, I found the most engaging teachers were those that not only conveyed great passion for their subject and teaching, but also challenged us to critically analyze the functioning of the world around us. Few students entering college understand what it means to think “like an economist.” This of course is hardly surprising since it takes much time and effort to create this most important “end product” of an economics education. Needless to say, the discipline of economics has a multitude of powerful tools and methodologies to analyze a wide array of important and fundamental issues and not just pedantic studies of “widgets.” It is my view that all teachers should try to engage students in a stimulating and focused environment that helps them succeed today and in the future. To communicate important ideas and insights to students in an effective and motivating manner, it is useful to create an environment that is conducive to discussion and interaction since this fosters the development of critical thinking skills that helps students to think independently. However, to begin a constructive learning process, teachers must select a “common” starting point. They must then use their pedagogical skills to “push” students to the next level.

Instructors should not only teach and help students learn economics, but should also foster the development of basic skills like logical analysis and critical evaluation which are necessary in every profession. While it is crucial to have an in-depth knowledge of a topic to motivate to explain it, the optimal way to communicate the material can depend on the student composition of the class and its length. For example, since summer courses are at taught an accelerated pace, I provide additional handout materials including a review of major concepts from prerequisite courses and distribute regular problem sets so that students can more easily learn the subject matter under time constraints. I diligently prepare for each course and individual lecture to determine the best way to introduce and discuss each major topic in the course. Research indicates that students often retain only a small portion of the most salient features in any class. Accordingly, rather than covering a plethora of topics with sparse detail, my classes focus on the most fundamental and overarching concepts and themes that highlight the most pertinent aspects of the course. This way students are more likely to learn and internalize the most important and useful ideas that are presented in the class.

2020

Managerial Economics and Strategy

Open Universities Australia Session Convener

2020

Economic Policy in Society

Open Universities Australia Session Convener

2014 - 2017

Introduction to Business Statistics

Convener and Lecturer

2014

Quantitative Analysis

Lecturer

2013

International Business Environment

(International Trade for Business)

Convener and Lecturer

2009

Economics of Information and the Internet

Convener and Lecturer

2007 - 2008

Macroeconomic Institutions and Policy

Convener and Lecturer

Testimonials

Unit Outlines

Managerial Economics and Strategy

This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of some of the main economic tools used in making sound managerial decisions in an increasingly complex and competitive business environment. It also aims to assist students to apply those tools to a variety of economic issues faced by business, non-profit organisations and government. Among the topics covered are market structures and their impact on industry performance, the pricing strategies of firms, capital budgeting and information imperfections in markets.

Business Statistics

This unit introduces you to a range of statistical techniques which managers use. You will apply these techniques to relatively simple practical examples. To do this you need a calculator. For larger applications you will learn how to use Microsoft Excel to perform any of the calculations associated with these statistical techniques. The focus in this subject however is on how to analyse and interpret your own results or the output from Excel. You will learn how to apply these techniques by working with examples which are relevant to most major business disciplines and the functional areas of large organizations. These include examples from Accounting, Economics, Finance, Financial Planning, Human Resource Management, Information Technology, Logistics and Transport and Marketing.

Economics of Information and the Internet

This unit will use concepts and tools from microeconomics to analyze and help students understand the economics of information and facets of information technology.

Economic Policy in Society

This unit represents the economic concepts of public choice theory, market failure and government failure will be used to analyse the conduct of a range of government policies in Australia. These policy areas include industry/agricultural policy, utilities regulation, health and welfare policy, taxation and education. In doing so the unit has three broad aims. The first is to help students to understand and appreciate the relevance of economic principles and concepts to the development of policy in Australian society. The second is to assist students to develop their ability to apply economic reasoning to real world policy issues. The third is to encourage students to contribute to the policy process and help shape a better society.

International Business Environment

This subject examines business perspectives of international trade and foreign direct investments by focusing on the factors affecting international business decision-makings in the complex international business environment. The multinational enterprise is a focus of study, while significant aspects of the international business environment such as financial, cultural, economic and political are examined as well as their influence in relation to current and future business performance. Current development in the global economy is also covered.

Macroeconomic Institutions and Policy

To understand how the actions of large institutions as well as governmental policy influence the economy.